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Cleaning With Nature Looking Ahead To Global Changes


How Traditional Antibiotics Are Killing You – The Dawn Of The Super-Bug

http://www.naturalnews.com/039425_gram-negative_superbugs_antibiotics.html

(NaturalNews) While globalists like Bill Gates are feverishly working on ways to reduce human population through vaccines, GMOs and abortions, an even more effective population killer is now emerging: drug-resistant strains of “gram-negative” bacteria: Superbugs.

The global abuse of antibiotics and the rise of drug-resistant superbugs has become an urgent issue of survival for the human race, and even mainstream medical experts are now describing microbiological doomsday scenarios if the situation isn’t reversed. As The Guardian reported today:

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria with the potential to cause untreatable infections pose “a catastrophic threat” to the population, the chief medical officer for Britain warns in a report calling for urgent action worldwide.

bacteriagreen

Big Pharma causes the problem, then walks away

How did it get this bad? After Big Pharma polluted the medical landscape with a flood of antibiotics that caused drug-resistant strains to emerge, it has since abandoned any new research on antibiotics, claiming “there’s no profit in it.”

The antibiotics pipeline is empty. But drug-resistant bacteria aren’t asleep at the wheel; they’re rapidly mutating, developing new biological defenses against Big Pharma’s drugs. With each passing month, the superbugs get stronger. “No new classes of antibiotics have been developed since 1987, and none are in the pipeline across the world,” reports The Independent.

It continues, “…for Big Pharma, there is little money in expensively developing new compounds which will only be taken in short courses, compared to a drug for blood pressure, say, which may have lifelong use for patients.”

Even if it were profitable to develop new antibiotics, it’s a losing game anyway because a drug that takes 10 years to develop can become useless in as little as one year in the real world. That’s thanks to the rapid mutation capabilities of gut bacteria.

The net result is that the western medical system that was built on chemicals as the weapons of war against disease has run out of chemicals to fight superbugs. The “end game” of modern medicine is upon us, and the drug industry openly admits it’s not even working on solutions to this problem.

Natural remedies for superbugs have been suppressed and censored

Meanwhile, the governments and medical institutions of the world have, for an entire century, suppressed the natural antibiotics cures that can very effectively kill superbugs. Natural remedies like colloidal silver, aloe vera, garlic, medicinal herbs and high-potency nutritional therapies have been attacked, censored and criminalized. This has left the population with a problem that’s best stated in three parts:

#1) A wave of antibiotic-resistant superbugs is accelerating toward humanity.
#2) Big Pharma has run out of chemicals to treat them.
#3) The corrupt medical system has censored natural antibiotics.

The result is that the people are left with no solutions other than to lay down and die.

Not coincidentally, that may be exactly what the system wants you to do.

Modern medicine IS population control

It turns out that the entire system of medicine has been veering aggressively toward population control for the past decade.

For example, vaccines were once widely known to be dangerous for pregnant women, but the medical authorities “flipped the script” just a few years ago and said that pregnant women now need more vaccines than everybody else. The upshot is that vaccines cause huge increases in spontaneous abortions (i.e. population reduction). For example, Gardasil is reportedly linked to more stillbirths than any other vaccine. Eugenicists like Bill Gates refer to this as “reproductive health,” by the way. That’s code for “population reduction.”

Chemotherapy would have never been given to pregnant women in years past, but now it’s actually recommended as a preventive cancer therapy for expectant mothers. Chemotherapy, of course, is a chemical weapon that kills unborn babies and causes spontaneous abortions, organ damage and birth defects.

The aggression behind today’s big vaccine push is also largely a population control measure. Vaccines cause infertility due to the mercury, aluminum and formaldehyde chemicals they contain. All of these chemicals interfere with fertility and gestation.

Most of the pharmaceuticals being heavily pushed today (statin drugs, blood thinners, etc.) are at least partially designed to kill you before you can collect social security.

The idea is to make sure the population only lives long enough to keep working and paying into the system, but not long enough to actually collect benefits which are bankrupting the nation. Before long, “dying early” is going to be pushed as “patriotic” and “good for the country.” You can fully expect the socialist government to start spreading guilt about longevity. If you live long enough to collect money from the government, they’re going to make sure you feel incredibly guilty about it. (“How dare you live long enough to collect some of the money we stole out of your paycheck during your working years!”)

Superbugs are a key ally to the system in all this because they create a convenient scapegoat to take the blame for a failed medical system. A patient who is over-medicated, immuno-suppressed and taken over by an aggressive superbug infection can be written off as another casualty of a “fatal infection.” Never mind the fact that the person was made vulnerable to infections by all the toxic therapies and prescription drugs that serve as the foundation of western chemical medicine.

Superbugs are the new Lee Harvey Oswalds of medicine: they take the blame for the killing and prevent people from asking in-depth questions about what really happened.

Probiotics remain completely ignored

What’s really astonishing in all this is the delusional belief that only Big Pharma can “discover” new drugs that kill these drug-resistant bacteria. In all of western medicine, there is never any discussion of the all-important role of probiotics in establishing healthy gut flora, thereby crowding out the dangerous strains. If “anti” biotics are the problem, then “pro” biotics are the solution.

It is absolutely astonishing that modern medicine refuses to advocate probiotics, and it reveals how the entire system of modern medicine remains stuck in a 1940’s mentality where the body was a “battleground” and medicines were “weapons” to be unleashed against “the enemy.”

This delusional metaphor is what has driven the failed system of modern medicine for nearly a century, and it’s the reason superbugs and antibiotics have reached a point of such insanity that the entire population is now threatened with the possibility of a runaway global pandemic.

The medical system also doesn’t understand synergistic phytonutrients and how a concert of plant-based chemicals work together in ways that are far more powerful than any one isolated chemical could ever be. Big Pharma is always looking for the next great isolated molecule but can never embrace the idea that isolated chemicals are always less effective and more dangerous than full-spectrum phytochemicals from the natural world. (A drug can never be as powerful as a plant, because a drug doesn’t have the phytonutrient complexity of a plant.)

Eliminating gram-negative superbugs from the gut of a patient is easy if you aren’t medically ignorant (i.e. trained in medical school). Simply embracing the power of antibacterial superfoods like garlic — combined with the health-protective powers of probiotics — yields phenomenal results. Food choice also impacts gut health (obviously), yet doctors rarely talk to their patients about what they should eat. Somehow, modern medicine has isolated food choice from health outcomes, creating a truly delusional health care system in which patients are treated with deadly chemicals rather than food as medicine.

This is what got us to this crisis in the first place: doctors functioning as chemical pushers… and patients surrendering their personal power to the failed medical system.

Why humanity’s superbug crisis can’t be solved with chemicals

To get out of this crisis, we can’t approach it with the same type of thinking that caused the problem in the first place. This isn’t a situation that can be solved with “another chemical.” This is going to require transcending the failed age of chemical medicine and embracing the factors of healthy gut flora — and that has everything to do with diet, supplements, superfoods, etc.

The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI), not surprisingly, can only see a future based on more chemicals. “More still needs to be done and we believe that for there to be a continual supply of effective antibiotics, a comprehensive review of the R&D [research and development] environment and good stewardship are required urgently,” they say (Guardian source, above).

This is a classic example of medical insanity. It’s the chemicals that brought us to this crisis, and the only solution they can think of is coming up with more chemicals. (Remember the definition of insanity? Doing the same thing over and over again while expecting different results…)

This is exactly like the Federal Reserve observing a global currency confidence crisis and deciding the best solution is to print more money. It’s like a heroin addict reasoning that the way to quit heroin is to take just one more hit.

When it comes to superbugs and medicine, we are living in an age of outright, runaway insanity that has infected nearly all the doctors, hospitals, drug companies and health authorities. Unless they wake up and finally recognize the error of their ways, this situation is only going to spiral into an ever-expanding crisis that may soon lead to a runaway superbug plague.

They don’t want to cure you; they want to kill you (slowly)

Yet the failed battle cry continues: “Just one more chemical!” Little do the doctors realize the system doesn’t want to find cures for infections and disease… the system wants people to die as early and as often as possible (but not before doctors, cancer clinics and drug companies extract their share of revenues from their human victims).

What they’re waiting for now is the spread of superbugs from hospital patients to home families, communities and neighborhoods. This is where things really accelerate in terms of disease transmission and population reduction. The doctors pump grandma full of antibiotics and drugs, destroy her intestinal flora and immune system, expose her to the deadly superbugs circulating around the hospital, then send her home with family where she can infect everyone else.

That’s modern medicine. That’s how the system really works, and that’s why medicine is a very real threat to the survival of the human race.

Remember: Big Pharma created the superbug problem. And now humanity stands on the brink of medical self-destruction because of it.

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About the author: Mike Adams (aka the “Health Ranger”) is the founding editor of NaturalNews.com, the internet’s No. 1 natural health news website, now reaching 7 million unique readers a month.

With a background in science and software technology, Adams is the original founder of the email newsletter technology company known as Arial Software. Using his technical experience combined with his love for natural health, Adams developed and deployed the content management system currently driving NaturalNews.com. He also engineered the high-level statistical algorithms that power SCIENCE.naturalnews.com, a massive research resource now featuring over 10 million scientific studies.

In addition to being the co-star of the popular GAIAM TV series called Secrets to Health, Adams is also the (non-paid) executive director of the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center (CWC), an organization that redirects 100% of its donations receipts to grant programs that teach children and women how to grow their own food or vastly improve their nutrition. Click here to see some of the CWC success stories.

In 2013, Adams created the Natural News Forensic Food Laboratory, a research lab that analyzes common foods and supplements, reporting the results to the public. He is well known for his incredibly popular consumer activism video blowing the lid on fake blueberries used throughout the food supply. He has also exposed “strange fibers” found in Chicken McNuggets, fake academic credentials of so-called health “gurus,” dangerous “detox” products imported as battery acid and sold for oral consumption, fake acai berry scams, the California raw milk raids, the vaccine research fraud revealed by industry whistleblowers and many other topics.

Adams has also helped defend the rights of home gardeners and protect the medical freedom rights of parents. Adams is widely recognized to have made a remarkable global impact on issues like GMOs, vaccines, nutrition therapies, human consciousness.

In addition to his activism, Adams is an accomplished musician who has released ten popular songs covering a variety of activism topics.

Click here to read a more detailed bio on Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, at HealthRanger.com.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/039425_gram-negative_superbugs_antibiotics.html#ixzz2xSIROpHr

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CDC’s ‘Bacteria of Nightmares’: A Monstrosity Created by Outdated Theory and Practice

Be sure to visit us at Advanced Probiotics for more detailed information and medical facts on probiotics products tested for human and agricultural use.

Watch these important videos from countries around the world that use probiotics to prevent the spread of deadly bacterias. (MUST SEE!)

As a person that uses probiotics for my healthy and in daily life, I can attest to case after case where modern medicine failed and the use of probiotics cleared my medical condition. Case in point, when I made a recent visit to my doctor for severe indigestion and stomach pain, the doctor prescribed 3 harsh antibiotics to “heal” my condition before he planned even more hospital stays and outpatient exams, along with regular pharmaceutical medicines to “cure me.” I began taking the medicines (against my better judgement) and the stomach problems only worsened. Using what I have learned about the use of probiotics for my farm animals at my ranch Blue Star Ranch, I had seen first hand how these probiotics help my poultry farm. So, I purchased at the grocery store yogurt with live probiotic bacteria. In a matter of 48 hours, my stomach problems vanished. Needless to say, I now eat yogurt every day in my juice and with all meals. If I had continued with antibiotics given to me from the doctor, I have no doubt, the illness would have continued and worsened. So, spread the good news. Probiotics for health, its the future for everyone’s good health. We are all waking up to these facts.

cdc_infection_nightmare(2)

Below are some “re blogging” of stories to spread the good news of how probiotics are replacing antibiotics.

Can probiotics stop superbugs?

Amazing facts about probiotics (see chart)

The CDC announced this week that millions in the US contract ‘super germs’ and 23,000 die each year, but isn’t their outdated antibiotic-and germ-focused disease model entirely to blame for this growing nightmare?

A new report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns about antibiotic overuse and the resultant rise of ‘super-bugs,’ establishing for the first time different ‘threat levels’ for each type of drug resistant bacteria.

Titled, Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013, the report states: “Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections.”

The report acknowledged that, “[M]ost deaths related to antibiotic resistance happen in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes,” and the estimates are based on “conservative assumptions and are likely minimum estimates.”

The report also offers a new pathogen grading system reminiscent of homeland security’s grading of terrorism threats, but instead of red, orange or yellow, the CDC is using “urgent,” “serious” and “concerning.”[1]

These are the CDC’s list of most highly concerning bacteria, prioritized according to ‘threat level’:

Urgent Threats

Clostridium difficile
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)
Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Serious Threats

Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacte
Drug-resistant Campylobacte
Fluconazole-resistant Candida (a fungus
Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLs)
Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE)
Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginos
Drug-resistant Non-typhoidal Salmonella
Drug-resistant Salmonella Typhi
Drug-resistant Shigella
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae
Drug-resistant tuberculosis
Concerning Threats

Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA)
Erythromycin-resistant Group A Streptococcus
Clindamycin-resistant Group B Streptococcus
The CDC’s director, Dr. Thomas Frieden, who recently caused worldwide alarm by describing Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae CRE as ‘nightmare bacteria,’ said if the current trends continue, “the medicine cabinet may be empty for patients who need them in the coming months and years.”

But isn’t our reliance on the ‘medicine cabinet’ and not the kitchen cupboard or spice rack at the heart of the problem?

The medicine cabinet has been filled with conventional antibiotics far too long. These mostly monochemical compounds are far too simplistic vis-à-vis the relatively complex array of antimicrobial compounds found within natural anti-infective spices and plant extracts and which have been used since time immemorial. Bacteria, which have evolved complex mechanisms to survive chemical poisoning, easily gain the upper hand. Not only do these agents indiscriminately kill the beneficial flora that enable us to produce infection-fighting compounds (e.g. bacteriocins, betaglucans, etc.), but they actually make the ‘bad’ bacteria stronger and more resistant to treatment.

How do antibiotics drive this drug resistance? Even when a conventional antibiotic is successful at destroying 99.9% of a harmful bacterial colony, generating the immediate appearance of success, the treatment will often leave the surviving minority subpopulation (in this case, the .1%) of bacteria to produce genetically-mediated resistance factors, as well as biofilm, enabling it to survive and eventually grow back to harmful proportions. When the .1% grows back to levels where it is capable of causing symptoms and signs of infection, the original antibiotic is completely ineffective; to the contrary, it will actually kill off all competing beneficial bacteria, making the antibiotic-resistant bacteria thrive. This then requires the use of even more toxic chemical treatments to attempt to kill the new drug resistant colony, repeating the same cycle over again. At the end of this road is multi-drug resistant infection, whose pathogenicity is a direct result of the use of these conventional agents, and which therefore can not be controlled by them.

Do we then blame conventional pharmaceutically-driven medicine’s impotence vis-à-vis these germs on the germs themselves, painting them as ‘super powerful’ vectors of death and destruction, or do we acknowledge the failure of the CDC’s default approach, which is to favor the germ model of disease where the emphasis is on using ‘life denying’ antibiotics (literally, anti- + bios or “against life”) to fight pathogenic ‘invaders,’ rather than building up the inner terrain of micoflora with ‘life affirming’ probiotics (literally, pro- + bios or “for life) and immune system supportive food compounds which form the basis of healthy immunity?

As the disease-mongering and concomitant fear-mongering is ratcheted up by national and global health organizations, it becomes clear how seamlessly the military and medical industrial establishments have merged in both their language and symbolism. Metaphors overlap. We wage wars with surgical precision in the ‘war theater,’ much like the operating theater, and we surveil, and preemptively strike microbial ‘terrorists’ with chemical weapons, feigning surprise when the collateral damage on innocence bystanders (our cells, our flora) far surpasses that of the so-called enemy, who is blamed nonetheless for our misguided medical theory and practice creating the monster of treatment-resistant infection.

At GreenMedInfo.com we index research directly from the National Library of Medicine indicating that indeed, drug- and multidrug- resistant pathogens can be shown through the scientific method to succumb to natural compounds, including foods and spices. This research demonstrates clearly that the alarming new biological threats announced by the CDC, and then reiterated globally through the mainstream media, can be countermanded through the use of plant medicines that the majority of the world still uses, and which can be obtained inexpensively, if not also sometimes grown in your backyard for free. But this very boon is also a curse, insofar as the hundreds of millions of dollars of capital needed to fund the necessary phase I, II and III clinical trials required for FDA drug approval will not flow into non-patentable substances which offer no return on investment. THIS is the #1 reason why the CDC, and the conventional medical establishment at large, will ignore the already widely available natural solutions literally growing beneath our feet, and which have been time-tested, multi-culturally, for thousands of years and by millions of folks who knew only plant medicine until very recently. They will look at the data we have indexed on GreenMedInfo.com and ignore and/or discredit it because it is ‘preclinical,’ and therefore will not pass through the political- and economically-motivated gauntlet of evidence-based medicine which claims absolute truth is only attainable through double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled and preferably multi-centered human clinical trials (despite the fact that these can require billions of capital to fund). We reject this totalitarian “gold standard” or “golden rule,” which exemplifies so clearly the aphorism: ‘they who own the gold make the rules.’


Probiotics May Protect Against Drug-Resistant Superbug, Study Finds

Hospitals have struggled in recent years with the rise of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). The strain most commonly affects older adults using antibiotics in hospitals and long-term care facilities. But rates have risen among younger individuals and other populations not typically considered high-risk, according to the Mayo Clinic.

“Each year, more than a half-million people get sick from C. difficile, and in recent years, C. difficileinfections have become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat,” the Mayo Clinic reports.

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Swedish Medical Center in Seattle is reviewing its probiotics policies in response to recent research, including Bastyr’s, says Dan Labriola, ND, medical director for naturopathic services at Swedish.

Per Vandvik, MD, a gastroenterologist in Norway, said the study helped convince him to prescribe probiotics along with antibiotics to reduce cases of CDAD. He hopes more care providers will recommend probiotics when they prescribe antibiotics.

“Most patients would want to take this treatment if they were well-informed about the benefits and absence of detectable harms,” says Dr. Vandvik, a co-author of the study.

For many, it’s old news that probiotics help restore the balance of bacteria in the intestinal tract. Sales of probiotic supplements and foods (such as yogurt, sauerkraut and other fermented foods) have risen sharply in recent years. (Read more on the benefits of probiotic foods.) They provide a balance to antibiotics, which fight disease but disrupt the intestinal balance.

“Using probiotics when taking antibiotics is sort of a quintessential naturopathic treatment,” Dr. Goldenberg says. “You use conventional medicine when needed, but you add a naturopathic element to make it safer.”

 

The Cochrane study analyzed data from 23 clinical trials with 4,213 total participants. It found that 2 percent of participants in the probiotic group experienced CDAD, compared to 5.5 percent in the placebo or no treatment control group.

As a meta-analysis, or study of other studies, the paper uses the Cochrane Collaboration’s widely praised approach of searching for every possible examination of the topic. The work took three years, but Dr. Goldenberg believes the process is necessary to root out biases that can distort any single trial.

“We used to think the gold standard of research was the large randomized controlled trial,” he says. “But researchers are finding that 50 percent of all studies, and even 25 percent of great studies, turn out to be wrong. They’re affected by all sorts of biases. You can’t see that unless you zoom out farther and combine a lot of randomized control trials together. Combining 10 or 20 clinical trials in a meta-analysis is really the platinum standard.”

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One common distortion is publication bias — the tendency that trials with positive results are more likely to be accepted by major journals. Cochrane reviews attempt to neutralize this problem by finding so-called gray literature — studies that have not been published in journals but appear at conferences, in dissertations or elsewhere. Seven of the trials Dr. Goldenberg’s team investigated came from gray literature.

“Done properly, systematic reviews weed out those biases,” says Jane Saxton, MLIS, Bastyr’s director of library services and a co-author on the study.

 

Surprisingly, the study found that C. difficile was still present in many patients, but diarrhea and other harmful effects were not. From the perspective of patient well-being, that’s a positive result, Dr. Vandvik says. Dr. Goldenberg adds that there are rare cases in which probiotics have dangerous effects, such as in very young infants or patients with severe pancreatic illnesses. The study concluded probiotics are safe for “immunocompetent patients.”

Dr. Goldenberg has collaborated on a previous Cochrane review and recently published a study of naturopathic attitudes toward evidence-based medicine. This summer he joined Northshore Family Practice in Kenmore, Washington, to focus on clinical practice.

The Cochrane study did not distinguish among types of probiotics — a task for further research. It was also restricted to probiotic supplements, not foods containing live cultures.

As a researcher, Dr. Goldenberg understands the precise focus on supplements. As a naturopathic doctor who ferments his own sauerkraut, kefir and kombucha, he finds it odd to focus on pills.

“Our results are restricted to patients who are prescribed antibiotics by their doctors to take probiotic pills at the same time,” he says. “As a naturopathic doctor, it seems ridiculous to take pills when I can ferment kefir in my own kitchen. We evolved eating fermented foods that contain probiotics. We have this incredibly complex, beautiful flora of different organisms in our gut.

“So while I recommend probiotic pills for patients taking antibiotics, for general health I tell patients to eat the foods we evolved to consume — whole foods, some of them fermented.”

—-


HEALTH CDC Report Links Antibiotics in Agriculture to Rise of Superbugs

See link to probiotic products below:

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report released Monday highlights a growing public health crisis. Superbugs or antibiotic resistant bacteria are increasingly a problem as people face infections that are more and more difficult to treat. These infections can include urinary tract infections, skin infections and soft tissue infections that require longer treatment or become more serious after the first round of antibiotics fail.

These infections, according to the CDC, occur most often outside of hospitals. Thus, the CDC report calls for responsible use of antibiotics and draws attention to the multiple reasons for the rise of superbugs that are leading to complicated and deadly infections. Those reasons include the use or misuse of antibiotics in human medicine and agriculture.

As it has before, the CDC makes clear that animal as well as human use of antibiotics is contributing to the problem. The report issued adds to the extensive literature documenting the link between agriculture and antibiotic resistant bacteria. It also specifically identifies several resistant bacteria as posing a serious threat, which have been associated with antibiotic use in agriculture. And it’s not the only recent scientific publication to link livestock and hospital infections. Here are a few peer-reviewed articles that have recently made the link

A recent study by Francois Lebreton and others found that some multidrug resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from hospital infections have emerged from animal strains. E. faecium is normally found in the guts of animals, even ours. Like E. coli, it can hang out in our gut without doing any harm, but once it goes to other places like the urinary tract or an open wound, it can cause serious infections especially when it is resistant to multiple antibiotics (superbug!) and importantly, vancomycin resistant Enterococcus was identified as a serious threat by the CDC. The authors looked at 73 different E. faecium strains, including strains isolated from the guts of healthy people, hospital infections, the guts of animals (including livestock) and the guts of hospital patients. The team of scientists made several discoveries, among them:

Most E. faecium isolated from hospital infections are more related to E. faecium found in animals than in healthy humans.
E. faecium from animals and especially the E. faecium isolated from hospital infections mutated at a higher rate and more likely contained multiple antibiotic resistance genes—including vancomycin resistance (were superbugs). In contrast, most isolates from healthy humans contained at most one.
Pigs carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were found on U.S. farms for the first time in 2007. Photo credit: Daniel Acker/ Bloomberg/ Getty Images
Pigs carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were found on U.S. farms for the first time in 2007. Photo credit: Daniel Acker/ Bloomberg/ Getty Images
Several recent studies have also found evidence of MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus—also identified as a serious threat by the CDC) in humans having origins in livestock. A study by Laura Spoor and others looked at the origins of some MRSA human isolates and found evidence indicating that livestock is one potential reservoir for pathogenic bacteria that can transfer to humans and eventually cause disease. Other MRSA studies linked to livestock have been highlighted in a Nature news story, and my colleague, Jonathan Kaplan, has drawn attention to these studies in a previous blog.

These studies add to a long line of evidence that agricultural misuse of antibiotics is contributing to the rise of antibiotic resistance bacteria that can cause infections that are increasingly difficult to treat. The CDC has again reiterated this point and called for policies to improve the use of antibiotics in both humans and animals and for better tracking and monitoring of antibiotic use.

Visit EcoWatch’s FACTORY FARMING page for more related news on this topic.


AntiBacterial Crackdown in USA

AntiBacterial Crackdown in USA

Posted on January 25, 2014 by Watcher
An estimated 75% of the anti-bacterial liquid soaps and body washes sold in the United States contain triclosan, a germ-killing ingredient. The only problem is, the Food and Drug Administration has no idea whether it actually works — and there’s some evidence it may pose health risks. [USA Today]

Consequently the FDA has “proposed rule requiring manufacturers to prove that their antibacterial cleaners are safe and more effective than plain soap and water”. That’s because when a product is promoted as killing 99.9% of germs, that’s the same result you get from soap and water. However, Antibacterial products can increase resistance in antibiotics.

The advertising used for these products makes consumers think if they wash with them they won’t get sick, said Kweder. “You’ll see pictures of people sneezing and coughing and looking pretty ill.”

But many of those images “look like people who have viral illnesses” such as the common cold, she said. Viruses are the most common cause of infections in the United States and antibacterial agents have no effect on them.

In Australia Dettol, presumably to counter the backlash they see coming, has been heavily promoting their hand wash product via Sophie’s story:

Posted in Official Responses | Leave a comment
Post-Antibiotic Might Look Like Pre-Antibiotic
Posted on January 25, 2014 by Watcher

An article at Matter looks into what we could reasonably expect when antibiotics fail en masse. It begins with the death of a fireman, less than 80 years ago:

I had always heard Joe had been injured at work: not burned, but bruised and cut when a heavy brass hose nozzle fell on him. The article revealed what happened next. Through one of the scrapes, an infection set in. After a few days, he developed an ache in one shoulder; two days later, a fever. His wife and the neighborhood doctor struggled for two weeks to take care of him, then flagged down a taxi and drove him fifteen miles to the hospital in my grandparents’ town. He was there one more week, shaking with chills and muttering through hallucinations, and then sinking into a coma as his organs failed. Desperate to save his life, the men from his firehouse lined up to give blood. Nothing worked. He was thirty when he died, in March 1938.

Penicillin-resistant staph emerged in 1940, while the drug was still being given to only a few patients. Tetracycline was introduced in 1950, and tetracycline-resistant Shigella emerged in 1959; erythromycin came on the market in 1953, and erythromycin-resistant strep appeared in 1968. As antibiotics became more affordable and their use increased, bacteria developed defenses more quickly. Methicillin arrived in 1960 and methicillin resistance in 1962; levofloxacin in 1996 and the first resistant cases the same year; linezolid in 2000 and resistance to it in 2001; daptomycin in 2003 and the first signs of resistance in 2004.

Without the protection offered by antibiotics, entire categories of medical practice would be rethought:

transplants
the use of ventilators, catheters, and ports
kidney dialysis
Caesarean sections
surgery on intestines and the urinary tract
bone marrow transplant
implantable devices
hip replacements
botox injections
liposuction
prostate biopsies
open-heart surgery
British health economists with similar concerns recently calculated the costs of antibiotic resistance. To examine how it would affect surgery, they picked hip replacements, a common procedure in once-athletic Baby Boomers. They estimated that without antibiotics, one out of every six recipients of new hip joints would die.

Antibiotics are administered prophylactically before operations as major as open-heart surgery and as routine as Caesarean sections and prostate biopsies. Without the drugs, the risks posed by those operations, and the likelihood that physicians would perform them, will change.

Medical procedures may involve a high risk of infections, but our everyday lives are pretty risky too. One of the first people to receive penicillin experimentally was a British policeman, Albert Alexander. He was so riddled with infection that his scalp oozed pus and one eye had to be removed. The source of his illness: scratching his face on a rosebush. (There was so little penicillin available that, though Alexander rallied at first, the drug ran out, and he died.)

Before antibiotics, five women died out of every 1,000 who gave birth. One out of nine people who got a skin infection died, even from something as simple as a scrape or an insect bite. Three out of ten people who contracted pneumonia died from it. Ear infections caused deafness; sore throats were followed by heart failure.

Posted in History | Leave a comment
Tuberculosis – still a major threat
Posted on January 6, 2014 by Watcher
I just came across a thoroughly interesting article from last year about a journalist who, whilst reporting on tuberculosis in Papua New Guinea, ended up catching the disease herself:

We spent some days poking around overflowing wards and diseased shanties for The Age, investigating the insidious reach of deadly, drug-resistant tuberculosis across Papua New Guinea. More than 60 per cent of the global burden of TB occurs in the Asia-Pacific region, and PNG bears some of the worst of it.

…Tuberculosis retains the distinction of being the greatest infectious killer in human history, claiming an estimated billion lives in the past 200 years. Its toll today is still second only to HIV (and it is the major killer of people with HIV). In 2011, 8.7 million people fell sick with TB.

…many are poorly nourished and dozens might share a room at night. TB thrives in such conditions.

…Some of the other children’s limbs are shrivelled, their heads misshapen and eyes vacant in a way I have come to recognise. They are survivors of TB meningitis, the infection having found its way into their brains, rotting away physical and intellectual capacity.

…TB is invisible because the people who suffer it are already on the margins, says Hewison. “They are the poor, the prisoners, alcoholics, refugees, Aboriginals, drug users, old people. And the drug companies forgot it because there is no money to be made there,”

…“Rising rates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB threaten global control efforts in both developing and developed countries,” The Lancet authors – Ben Marais among them – warned. The rise of drug-resistant TB and the ease of international travel means “the threat and range and spread of untreatable TB is very real …

…A chest tube is installed to drain fluid and I’m pumped with antibiotics that burn like fury as they flow through the cannulas in my wrists …I move to the Royal Melbourne Hospital where I’m put into the care of an infectious disease team and isolated… at least two years of aggressive drug treatment, including four months of intravenous drips.

———

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is a form of tuberculosis caused by bacteria that are resistant to some of the most effective anti-TB drugs. XDR-TB strains have arisen after the mismanagement of individuals with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB).

One in three people in the world is infected with TB bacteria. Only when the bacteria become active do people become ill with TB. Bacteria become active as a result of anything that can reduce the person’s immunity, such as HIV, advancing age, or some medical conditions. TB can usually be treated with a course of four standard, or first-line, anti-TB drugs. If these drugs are misused or mismanaged, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) can develop. MDR-TB takes longer to treat with second-line drugs, which are more expensive and have more side-effects. XDR-TB can develop when these second-line drugs are also misused or mismanaged and therefore also become ineffective.

XDR-TB raises concerns of a future TB epidemic with restricted treatment options, and jeopardizes the major gains made in TB control and progress on reducing TB deaths among people living with HIV/AIDS. It is therefore vital that TB control be managed properly and new tools developed to prevent, treat and diagnose the disease.

The true scale of XDR-TB is unknown as many countries lack the necessary equipment and capacity to accurately diagnose it. It is estimated however that there are around 40,000 cases per year. As of June 2008, 49 countries had confirmed cases of XDR-TB. By 2013, that number had risen to 84. [Wikipedia]

An article at Matter looks into what we could reasonably expect when antibiotics fail en masse. It begins with the death of a fireman, less than 80 years ago:

I had always heard Joe had been injured at work: not burned, but bruised and cut when a heavy brass hose nozzle fell on him. The article revealed what happened next. Through one of the scrapes, an infection set in. After a few days, he developed an ache in one shoulder; two days later, a fever. His wife and the neighborhood doctor struggled for two weeks to take care of him, then flagged down a taxi and drove him fifteen miles to the hospital in my grandparents’ town. He was there one more week, shaking with chills and muttering through hallucinations, and then sinking into a coma as his organs failed. Desperate to save his life, the men from his firehouse lined up to give blood. Nothing worked. He was thirty when he died, in March 1938.

Penicillin-resistant staph emerged in 1940, while the drug was still being given to only a few patients. Tetracycline was introduced in 1950, and tetracycline-resistant Shigella emerged in 1959; erythromycin came on the market in 1953, and erythromycin-resistant strep appeared in 1968. As antibiotics became more affordable and their use increased, bacteria developed defenses more quickly. Methicillin arrived in 1960 and methicillin resistance in 1962; levofloxacin in 1996 and the first resistant cases the same year; linezolid in 2000 and resistance to it in 2001; daptomycin in 2003 and the first signs of resistance in 2004.

Without the protection offered by antibiotics, entire categories of medical practice would be rethought:

transplants
the use of ventilators, catheters, and ports
kidney dialysis
Caesarean sections
surgery on intestines and the urinary tract
bone marrow transplant
implantable devices
hip replacements
botox injections
liposuction
prostate biopsies
open-heart surgery
British health economists with similar concerns recently calculated the costs of antibiotic resistance. To examine how it would affect surgery, they picked hip replacements, a common procedure in once-athletic Baby Boomers. They estimated that without antibiotics, one out of every six recipients of new hip joints would die.

Antibiotics are administered prophylactically before operations as major as open-heart surgery and as routine as Caesarean sections and prostate biopsies. Without the drugs, the risks posed by those operations, and the likelihood that physicians would perform them, will change.

Medical procedures may involve a high risk of infections, but our everyday lives are pretty risky too. One of the first people to receive penicillin experimentally was a British policeman, Albert Alexander. He was so riddled with infection that his scalp oozed pus and one eye had to be removed. The source of his illness: scratching his face on a rosebush. (There was so little penicillin available that, though Alexander rallied at first, the drug ran out, and he died.)

Before antibiotics, five women died out of every 1,000 who gave birth. One out of nine people who got a skin infection died, even from something as simple as a scrape or an insect bite. Three out of ten people who contracted pneumonia died from it. Ear infections caused deafness; sore throats were followed by heart failure.

Posted in History | Leave a comment
Tuberculosis – still a major threat
Posted on January 6, 2014 by Watcher
I just came across a thoroughly interesting article from last year about a journalist who, whilst reporting on tuberculosis in Papua New Guinea, ended up catching the disease herself:

We spent some days poking around overflowing wards and diseased shanties for The Age, investigating the insidious reach of deadly, drug-resistant tuberculosis across Papua New Guinea. More than 60 per cent of the global burden of TB occurs in the Asia-Pacific region, and PNG bears some of the worst of it.

…Tuberculosis retains the distinction of being the greatest infectious killer in human history, claiming an estimated billion lives in the past 200 years. Its toll today is still second only to HIV (and it is the major killer of people with HIV). In 2011, 8.7 million people fell sick with TB.

…many are poorly nourished and dozens might share a room at night. TB thrives in such conditions.

…Some of the other children’s limbs are shrivelled, their heads misshapen and eyes vacant in a way I have come to recognise. They are survivors of TB meningitis, the infection having found its way into their brains, rotting away physical and intellectual capacity.

…TB is invisible because the people who suffer it are already on the margins, says Hewison. “They are the poor, the prisoners, alcoholics, refugees, Aboriginals, drug users, old people. And the drug companies forgot it because there is no money to be made there,”

…“Rising rates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB threaten global control efforts in both developing and developed countries,” The Lancet authors – Ben Marais among them – warned. The rise of drug-resistant TB and the ease of international travel means “the threat and range and spread of untreatable TB is very real …

…A chest tube is installed to drain fluid and I’m pumped with antibiotics that burn like fury as they flow through the cannulas in my wrists …I move to the Royal Melbourne Hospital where I’m put into the care of an infectious disease team and isolated… at least two years of aggressive drug treatment, including four months of intravenous drips.

———

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is a form of tuberculosis caused by bacteria that are resistant to some of the most effective anti-TB drugs. XDR-TB strains have arisen after the mismanagement of individuals with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB).

One in three people in the world is infected with TB bacteria. Only when the bacteria become active do people become ill with TB. Bacteria become active as a result of anything that can reduce the person’s immunity, such as HIV, advancing age, or some medical conditions. TB can usually be treated with a course of four standard, or first-line, anti-TB drugs. If these drugs are misused or mismanaged, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) can develop. MDR-TB takes longer to treat with second-line drugs, which are more expensive and have more side-effects. XDR-TB can develop when these second-line drugs are also misused or mismanaged and therefore also become ineffective.

XDR-TB raises concerns of a future TB epidemic with restricted treatment options, and jeopardizes the major gains made in TB control and progress on reducing TB deaths among people living with HIV/AIDS. It is therefore vital that TB control be managed properly and new tools developed to prevent, treat and diagnose the disease.

The true scale of XDR-TB is unknown as many countries lack the necessary equipment and capacity to accurately diagnose it. It is estimated however that there are around 40,000 cases per year. As of June 2008, 49 countries had confirmed cases of XDR-TB. By 2013, that number had risen to 84. [Wikipedia]

Posted in Tuberculosis | Leave a comment
Klebsiella pneumoniae: warning sign
Posted on November 21, 2013 by Watcher
How’s this for a warning sign?

Doctors are warning Australians to stop travelling overseas for elective surgery, after a New Zealand man contracted a superbug that no antibiotic could treat.

Brian Pool, a 68-year-old teacher, is believed to be New Zealand’s first victim of an aggressive bacterium that experts believe he caught in Asia.

”It’s the first time I’ve ever seen a totally resistant bacterium,” said Dr Mark Jones, a clinical microbiologist at Wellington Hospital. ”Nothing would touch it.”

…Tests showed he contracted Klebsiella pneumoniae, a strain of bacteria that produce enzymes that are completely drug-resistant. ”It is likely he caught it while in India,” said Dr Jones. ”The bacterium probably became infectious after he had surgery for a hernia.”

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/national/doctors-warn-on-overseas-surgery-after-teacher-brian-pool-catches-superbug-20131120-2xvvu.html#ixzz2lHrVC6MF

Posted in Untreatable Diseases | Leave a comment
Antibiotic Failure Makes Newsweek Cover Story
Posted on October 21, 2013 by Watcher

The article starts off with the tragic story of a young girl who survives a staph infection – but only just and she will always need medical help. Ten years ago she would have survived without a scratch… but today there is only one product left that can treat this infection, and it has nasty side-effects.

As recently as a decade ago, Addie’s story would have been a shocking anomaly, the kind of case that comes along once in any doctor’s life.

But after years of futile warnings from scientists that overuse of antibiotics was causing bacteria to evolve into strains resistant to drugs, experts in the field say we have reached a tipping point, and some deadly pathogens are becoming incurable. “We are confronting one of the gravest threats to public health that we have ever faced,” said Dr. Lance Price, a professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services who specializes in studying resistant bacteria. “We are entering a place we don’t want to be, with people dying of infections that could have treated in the past.”

There are many anecdotes shared, all about people who would have been successfully treated until recently:

A few months ago, she consulted on a case of a woman suffering from a resistant bacterial infection of her gall bladder. There were no antibiotics that could treat her; with no options, the patient was sent to hospice so she could die comfortably. A plastic surgeon she knows also had a horrifying case: A knee replacement implant in a patient had collected untreatable bacteria. Doctors were forced to amputate the leg to prevent the infection from spreading any further.

It isn’t just when infections are the primary problem. Some medical procedures will become to difficult unless antibiotics can be trusted to work. It is looking like heart transplants will no longer be tenable. And worse, no more chemotherapy.

Posted in Media | Leave a comment
Cleaning Robots Reduce Infection
Posted on October 9, 2013 by Watcher

A new study conducted by infection control experts at Johns Hopkins Hospital demonstrates that patients admitted to hospital rooms decontaminated using Bioquell hydrogen peroxide vapor technology, rather than standard cleaning protocols, were significantly less likely to acquire multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), or so-called hospital superbugs. The study is published in this month’s issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. The Bioquell system consists of automated devices that disperse an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered sterilant into the air and onto surfaces and then convert the sterilant to a harmless state.

http://www.bioquell.com/news/johns-hopkins-study-shows-HPV-technology-reduces-patient-risk/

This automated system (i.e. robot) reduced multidrug-resistant infections by 64%, in a study lasting 30 months and involving 6350 patients. Not only does this prove how inadequately hospitals are generally cleaned, it also shows the way forward – don’t trust humans with cleanliness.

Posted in Hygiene | Leave a comment
MRSA ST398 Making Farmers Ill
Posted on May 3, 2013 by Watcher
This is from New Scientist last year:

Dosing livestock with antibiotics can be bad for farmers’ health. A strain of MRSA that causes skin infections and sepsis in farm workers evolved its resistance to antibiotics inside farm animals.

The ST398 strain of MRSA first appeared in 2003 and is prevalent in US livestock. Humans who pick it up from animals can become dangerously ill, but it cannot yet spread from human to human.

And now, according to The Daily Mail, strain ST398 is showing up in British milk:

Scientists tested 1,500 samples of bulk milk and found seven cases of MRSA ST398 from five farms in England, Scotland and Wales.

It might not be long before the sometimes deadly ST398 evolves, developing the ability to be transmitted between humans. One more tragic antibiotic fail waiting to unfold.

An educated opinion on this news can be found at Wired.com.

Note: The pasteurization process should kill MRSA, but not all milk and cheese is
pasteurized.

Posted in Agriculture | Leave a comment
Upper Respiratory Infections Do Not Need Antibiotics
Posted on April 9, 2013 by Watcher
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania investigated UK data covering over 1.5 million visits to doctors by 800,000 people with upper respiratory infections over a period of 20 years.

Just over 65% of the patients, who were all adults, received antibiotics for their infections. The patients were studied over 15 days following their first doctor visit to see how many were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia or any adverse event that might be related to the administration of the drugs, such as heart problems, liver or kidney toxicity, diarrhea and seizures.

Overall, there were 296 people admitted to the hospital with a case of pneumonia within 15 days of the initial doctor visit. That was 22 people admitted to a hospital with pneumonia for each 100,000 doctor visits if they did not receive an antibiotic – and 18 people per 100,000 who were treated with antibiotics.

Researchers said that “12,255 or more people would have to be treated with antibiotics to prevent one person from being hospitalized.” We aren’t even talking about saving lives, just saving hospitalization. Considering the harm that antibiotics do to an individual’s gut health, and the rise of super bugs, it is immediately obvious that prescribing antibiotics for upper respiratory infections should be made illegal.

But no, we’ll keep on trusting that doctors know best.

Posted in Statistics | Leave a comment
The Skin of Green-eyed Tree Frogs
Posted on March 19, 2013 by Watcher
It makes sense that some members of the animal world have their own forms of antibiotic resistance, and that some might be easy to harvest by humans, or more likely, be synthesized.

The skin of Australian Green-eyed Tree Frogs have an antimicrobial secretion that is being used to create new drugs in the war against superbugs such as Golden Staph.

Although frogs have lungs, they absorb oxygen through their skin, and for this to occur efficiently, the skin must be moist. A disadvantage of moist skin is pathogens can thrive on it, increasing the chance of infection. To counteract this, frogs secrete peptides that destroy these pathogens. The skin secretion from the green tree frog contains caerins, a group of peptides with antibacterial and antiviral properties. It also contains caerulins, which have the same physiological effects as CCK-8, a digestive hormone and hunger suppressant. Several peptides from the skin secretions of the green tree frog have been found to destroy HIV without harming healthy T-cells.
[Source: Wikipedia]

It all comes down to investigating how the ingredients of the secretions interact with cell membranes – if scientists can work that out they might be able to create more viable antibiotics. The two techniques they are utilizing are X-ray scattering and a neutron reflectometer.


Prevent Deadly Bacteria Spread – Probiotic Uses Agricultural and Pet

Advanced Probiotics For Agricultural And Pets A MUST For Healthy Animals

Many people often fear bacteria – believing they are toxic, or even deadly. However, did you know that certain microorganisms can be essential for your pet’s good health? Many bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum are considered “friendly” bacteria that can live in your pet’s gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These play an important role in protecting against illness and harmful organisms. Theoretically, balancing the “good” or “friendly” to “bad” or harmful bacteria ratio can help support digestive health.

Advanced Probiotics For Agricultural And Pets A MUST For Healthy Animals

Sometimes, however, the proportion of friendly-to-harmful bacteria is thrown off. One example of this is when using antibiotics to fight infection. Antibiotics can destroy friendly bacteria, leaving your pet with less ability to fight off harmful microorganisms that he or she might encounter at a later date. Anxiety, depression, stress, certain processed foods and even your pet’s age may also affect the amount of good bacteria in his GI tract.

Advanced Probiotics For Agricultural And Pets A MUST For Healthy Animals

What functions do certain probiotics serve?
Probiotics for dogs or cats are nutrition supplements made up of different types of friendly bacteria. Complete pet probiotics typically include:

• Bifidobacterium lactis – Immune system health
• Bifidobacterium animalis – Digestive health
• Lactobacillus acidophilus – Digestive health
• Bifodobacterium longum – Digestive and Immune system health
• Bifidobacterium bifidium – Intestinal and Immune system health

In humans, studies have shown probiotic supplements can provide several health benefits:
• Maintain a healthy microfloral population in the gut
• Aid in digestion by increasing the absorption of nutrients
• Helping strengthen the immune system
• Prevent or control certain diseases

Is it also true that supplementing your cat or dog’s diet with probiotics could help him or her in these areas, as well? Unfortunately, sufficient evidence to support effectiveness and safety for pets is lacking. More research needs to be done.

Many pet health specialists are concerned that probiotics for pet use are not as tightly controlled as the Food and Drug Administration monitors drugs for humans. Therefore, until the manufacturing and claims associated with these products are better controlled, it’s important to consult with your veterinarian for advice on the proper use of probiotics for your pet.

Some brands of commercial pet food list probiotics on the label. Unfortunately, researchers found many of those claims are often wrong. The same can be said for most available probiotic supplements sold for pet use.

Advanced Probiotics For Agricultural And Pets A MUST For Healthy Animals


‘Nightmare’ Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Hospitals

http://consumer.healthday.com/infectious-disease-information-21/antibiotics-news-30/nightmare-bacteria-spreading-in-u-s-hospitals-nursing-homes-cdc-674130.html

‘Nightmare’ Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Hospitals, Nursing Homes: CDC

Half of those infected die from this antibiotic-resistant bacteria

A “nightmare” bacteria that is resistant to powerful antibiotics and kills half of those it infects has surfaced in nearly 200 U.S. hospitals and nursing homes, federal health officials reported Tuesday.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 4 percent of U.S. hospitals and 18 percent of nursing homes had treated at least one patient with the bacteria, called Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), within the first six months of 2012.

“CRE are nightmare bacteria. Our strongest antibiotics don’t work and patients are left with potentially untreatable infections,” CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said in a news release. “Doctors, hospital leaders and public health [officials] must work together now to implement the CDC’s ‘detect and protect’ strategy and stop these infections from spreading.”

“The good news,” Frieden added at an afternoon teleconference, “is we now have an opportunity to prevent its further spread.” But, he continued, “We only have a limited window of opportunity to stop this infection from spreading to the community and spreading to more organisms.”

CRE are in a family of more than 70 bacteria called enterobacteriaceae, including Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli, that normally live in the digestive system.

In recent years, some of these bacteria have become resistant to last-resort antibiotics known as carbapenems.

Although CRE bacteria are not yet found nationwide, they have increased fourfold within the United States in the past decade, with most cases reported in the Northeast.

Health officials said they’re concerned about the rapid spread of the bacteria, which can endanger the lives of patients and healthy people. For example, in the last 10 years, the CDC tracked one CRE from one health-care facility to similar facilities in 42 states.

One type of CRE, a resistant form of Klebsiella pneumoniae, has increased sevenfold in the past decade, according to the CDC’s March 5 Vital Signs report.

“To see bacteria that are resistant is worrisome, because this group of bacteria are very common,” said Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical associate professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.

Most CRE infections to date have been in patients who had prolonged stays in hospitals, long-term facilities and nursing homes, the report said.

The bacteria kill up to half the patients whose bloodstream gets infected and are easily spread from patient to patient on the hands of health-care workers, the CDC said.

Moreover, CRE bacteria can transfer their antibiotic resistance to other bacteria of the same type.

This problem is the result of the overuse of antibiotics, Siegel said. “The more you use an antibiotic, the more resistance is going to emerge,” he said. “This is an indictment of the overuse of this class of antibiotic.”

What’s needed are new antibiotics, Siegel said, adding that pharmaceutical companies lack the financial motivation to develop them right now. “Eventually, there will be enough resistance so drug companies will have a financial incentive. In the meantime, lives can be lost,” he said.

Added Dr. Ghinwa Dumyati, associate professor of medicine at the University of Rochester in New York: “At this time, our best prevention is detection and infection control. The incidence [of CRE] is low and we are looking to prevent it before it gets much higher and we cannot control it.”

To beat back the spread of these bacteria, the CDC wants hospitals and other health-care facilities to take the following steps:
Enforce infection-control precautions.
Group together patients with CRE.
Segregate staff, rooms and equipment to patients with CRE.
Tell facilities when patients with CRE are transferred.
Use antibiotics carefully.

Additional funding of research and technology is critical to prevent and quickly identify CRE, the CDC said.

Countries where CRE is more common have had some success controlling it.

Israel, for example, worked to reduce CRE in its 27 hospitals, and CRE rates dropped by more than 70 percent. Some U.S. facilities and states have also seen similar reductions, the agency said.

“We have seen in outbreak after outbreak that when facilities and regions follow the CDC’s prevention guidelines, CRE can be controlled and even stopped,” Dr. Michael Bell, acting director of the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, said in the news release. “As trusted health-care providers, it is our responsibility to prevent further spread of these deadly bacteria.”

Siegel said there are measures patients can take to reduce their risk of infection. “No. 1 on the list is [not to] wish that your hospital stay is extended. Patients think they are safer at the hospital, but that may not be true,” he said. “And try to go into a clean hospital.”

Patients should also make sure doctors and staff wear gloves and wash their hands when treating them, he said.